THE DEVIL IS IN THE DETAILS:
A DAY OF THOROUGH ANGELICA TREE REMOVAL

DEDICATED AND TALENTED ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION TEAM TACKLES TECHNICALLY CHALLENGING TASK OF REMOVING JAPANESE ANGELICA TREE.

Isabelle Dijols cuts down Aralia elata  (the Japanese Angelica Tree) - Morris Park, Philadelphia
Isabelle Dijols cuts down Aralia elata (the Japanese Angelica Tree) - Morris Park, Philadelphia

In partnership with Fairmount Park Environment and Stewardship Division (Philadelphia Parks & Recreation), The Sanguine Root staff and community volunteers focused on removing a significant and problematic population of Aralia elata from Morris Park.

See February 17th’s post for more information on the Aralia elata invasion problem in the park.

Scott Umlauf, Darby Creek Watershed Resident, hard at work restoring his part of the watershed
Scott Umlauf, Darby Creek Watershed Resident, hard at work restoring his part of the watershed
Scott Umlauf successfully cuts down Aralia elata in preparation for herbicide application by Certified Fairmount Park Technicians
Scott Umlauf successfully cuts down Aralia elata in preparation for herbicide application by Certified Fairmount Park Technicians
Tom Dougherty, Land Steward, Department Of Parks and Recreation, applies herbicide to cut stumps and trunks of Aralia elata
Tom Dougherty, Land Steward, Department of Parks and Recreation, applies herbicide to cut stumps and trunks of Aralia elata
Luke Rhodes, Restoration Field Technician,Department of Parks and Rec targeting hundreds of cut stumps and basal bark application of Aralia elata
Luke Rhodes, Restoration Field Technician, Department of Parks and Recreation, targeting hundreds of cut stumps with herbicide, and applying basal bark application to larger uncut specimens
Sean Solomon, co-founder of The Sanguine Root, expresses profound gratitude to the dedicated community volunteers and Fairmount Park Staff
Sean Solomon, co-founder of The Sanguine Root, expresses profound gratitude to the dedicated community volunteers and Department of Parks And Recreation Staff
Amongst a grove of Aralia elata, the remaining husk of an American Chestnut fruit
Amongst a grove of Aralia elata, the remaining husk of an American Chestnut fruit

The Herbicide used is Garlon 4 ‘ultra’ dyed blue to prevent redundant applications.

Meticulous cut stump herbicide application - Morris Park, Philadelphia
Meticulous cut stump herbicide application - Morris Park, Philadelphia
Luke Rhodes and Sean Solomon strategize
Luke Rhodes and Sean Solomon strategize
Lunch Break!
Lunch Break!
Red Tailed Hawk spotted on Morris Park Road by Jacob Russell
Red Tailed Hawk spotted on Morris Park Road by Jacob Russell
Luke Rhodes applying basal bark herbicide to Ailanthus altissima
Luke Rhodes applying basal bark herbicide to Ailanthus altissima
Tom Dougherty on urban environmental restoration: "The devil is in the details"  (treating Ailanthus altissima) - Morris Park, Philadelphia
Tom Dougherty on urban environmental restoration: "The devil is in the details " (treating Ailanthus altissima) - Morris Park, Philadelphia

Ten Ailanthus trees (Ailanthus altissima) were also addressed. These trees were throwing out thousands of seeds every year creating a huge problem of seedlings that constantly had to be pulled and the threat of a more serious infestation.This is the tree often found growing out the sides of buildings, in sidewalk cracks, vacant lots and back alleys. The amount of property damage it has done is astounding, and it has the potential to destroy the entire built city in a matter of a few years if left alone. In a forest setting it will crowd out native species and create a monoculture of trees.  This menacing invasive was introduced as an ornamental in 1784.  It has a distinguishing foul odor when the plant is disturbed.   We are very happy that our Department of Parks and Recreation technicians were able to apply basal bark herbicide to the trees.

Basal Bark herbicide application of Ailanthus altissima
Basal Bark herbicide application of Ailanthus altissima
Group Picture
Group Picture

Thanks again to our great crew: From Left to right, Luke Rhodes, Sean Solomon, Isabelle Dijols, Scott Umlauf, Thomas Dougherty, and Jacob Russell