Archive for March, 2014

SAVANNAH STREET TREES

Saturday, March 29th, 2014

The general appearance of the Park or Square should be pleasing to the eye in all its approaches; its make-up so arranged as to give a changing variety in the different outlooks.  It is, therefore, a place to be relieved as much as possible from monotony and rigid lines.”

– An Examination of the Street and Park Trees of Savannah, Georgia, Park and Tree Commission, Savanna, Georgia,  Bulletin 1, Geo B. Sudworth, April, 1897

Savannah Street Trees, www.thesanguineroot.com

Savannah Street Trees, www.thesanguineroot.com

Sabal palmetto

The beautiful city begins.

Along the street opposite city hall, Savannah, Georgia, the Sabal palmetto creates a formal planting worthy of an important city. Savannah   makes an impression on the American landscape that is imaginative and unforgettable.

Savannah, Georgia has survived and persevered. It has since preserved, conserved and restored a sense and vision of a city rarely glimpsed in the contemporary landscape, however Savannah was mostly preserved, and to walk through this city is a pleasure.

A vision was created and abided by for many years, a vision of public squares and trees. We oohed and awed at the architecture and the distinctly southern grandeur and refinement of taste; a blend of urbanism, gardening and public spaces- a graciousness rarely afforded in such splendor in other urban areas we have experienced- here it is, the panoramic of a storied city, this unforgettable, treed vista of understanding and conscious practice of arbor-culture that blends beautifully with the built and ever-so lived in city-scape.

The street trees of Savannah are often planted in a line, but are just as often found in the state of intersection, combined together telling a story of the favored trees of a particular era, the trees that have persisted, and even trees that were imported from other continents. Below is an assemblage of Live Oaks in the back-round, with Sabal palmetto in the foreground, mixed with the lower growing Butia capitata, the Pindo Palm – a South American import.  This lush greenery in a higher density neighborhood of row-houses with on street parking, all of which is highly coveted real-estate.

IMG_3625 IMG_3702 IMG_3604

The charm of brick sidewalks and streets has been preserved, providing a warm texture and color to the urban landscape.

Savannah Street Trees, www.thesanguineroot.com

Savannah Street Trees, www.thesanguineroot.com

A row of Butia capitata, the South American Pindo Palms. Below, Isabelle poses with an Asian Magnolia blooming away down by the waterfront.

IMG_3733 IMG_3795

Magnolia grandiflora
IMG_3670

 

Savannah Street Trees, www.thesanguineroot.com

Savannah Street Trees, www.thesanguineroot.com

This is the Southern Magnolia (Magnolia grandiflora), planted as a street tree here in Savannah. Much can be said of this Grand Dame of  a native Magnolia. It is an evergreen giving even a dull February day some degree of distinction.

Savannah Street Trees, www.thesanguineroot.com

Savannah Street Trees, www.thesanguineroot.com

Note how much space is dedicated to the trees, still sharing with parking meters and telephone poles.

Savannah Street Trees, www.thesanguineroot.com

Savannah Street Trees, www.thesanguineroot.com

Much of Savannah retains the feel of a city with a residential quality, lots of porches, brick, walkability, with short blocks, all of them near squares. It could use a streetcar system to further enhance transportation and reduce auto traffic.

Savannah Street Trees, www.thesanguineroot.com

Savannah Street Trees, www.thesanguineroot.com

This above, appears to be the Savannah Holly, Ilex attenuata ‘savannah’.

Savannah Street Trees, www.thesanguineroot.com

Savannah Street Trees, www.thesanguineroot.com

And the Crepe Myrtle,  Lagerstroemia. Often planted along highway intersections and large commercial and industrial properties and strip malls throughout the South, we found this elegantly pruned row as a street tree. These specific specimens were trained in the multi-stemmed form of this Asian Tree/shrub.

Savannah Street Trees, www.thesanguineroot.com

Savannah Street Trees, www.thesanguineroot.com

Below, these Crepe Myrtles have been……Pollarded perhaps?  This is done to increase the flowering density, but at the expense of having to look at a butchered stub for the other half of the year.

IMG_3682 IMG_3731

Here the Crepe Myrtles  are kept gracefully as a street tree.

Savannah Street Trees, www.thesanguineroot.com

Savannah Street Trees, www.thesanguineroot.com

In the next few pictures we show the use of the Sago Palm (Cycas revoluta) planted street-side.

IMG_3679

IMG_3662

 

Savannah Street Trees, www.thesanguineroot.com

Savannah Street Trees, www.thesanguineroot.com

On this block, there is more of a feeling of being in a forest than on a city block. The vegetation must contribute to cooler temperatures in the heat of the summer.

Savannah Street Trees, www.thesanguineroot.com

Savannah Street Trees, www.thesanguineroot.com

From a distance, what appears to be the blooming Red Maple across the street. There is the possibility this specimen could be crossed with a Silver Maple.

Savannah Street Trees, www.thesanguineroot.com

Savannah Street Trees, www.thesanguineroot.com

Quercus virginiana

Savannah Street Trees, www.thesanguineroot.com

Savannah Street Trees, www.thesanguineroot.com

The Southern Live Oak (Quercus Virginiana) is the most iconic tree of Savannah, Georgia. The evergreen Live Oaks with their drooping, curvaceous branches, draped in Spanish moss create the most atmospheric Southern quality to Savannah’s streets and public squares.  The city planners may have had some to work with in the early layouts, but they also had to plant and design the city with these trees in mind, and now we get to enjoy them in their maturity.

These trees are the essence of the patina of age a city can inherit from the aesthetically minded and articulate city planners and engaged citizens who despised the monotony of thoughtless development and sought to nurture and create the iconic Savannah we can enjoy today.

Perhaps as the city expanded outwards  in the ever growing need for housing and the accommodations of business, land was being cleared for building, but the founding lawmakers, developers and owners had all experienced the qualities of this native tree on a piece of land; its shade in the summer and greenery in the winter; and perhaps they also saw them felled on city lots to be slated for development, or sold for ship-building as these trees provided excellent structural components for curves in the hulls of ships- and their loss, especially in the summer’s sun proved to be unforgettable: and the trees were soon kept in place or re-planted as saplings in the implemented planning of blocks , homes and public squares.

Savannah Street Trees, www.thesanguineroot.com

Savannah Street Trees, www.thesanguineroot.com

Always thinking even on holiday, exactly what is it that makes a beautiful, unforgettable city? There is no one answer, of course, because every city is in a different place, with a different geology, climate, and topography and history. For those who are working actively to improve their own cities and towns, neighborhoods and blocks, the same issues arise above the obvious ones of safety and comfort: walkability, sense of community, access to commerce and other communities. The sense that neighbors are looking out for each other or at least there are actually neighbors that may care about your well-being.

Public spaces that are actively utilized and are alive with the community. These are just some of the qualities of a functioning city, the city we want to live in. There are many manifestations of the utopian urban setting proposed and built, and Savannah has one that is quite pleasant and its aesthetic qualities of urban development and maintenance are worth considering.

Savannah Street Trees, www.thesanguineroot.com

Savannah Street Trees, www.thesanguineroot.com

Savannah Street Trees, www.thesanguineroot.com

Savannah Street Trees, www.thesanguineroot.com

Cities are becoming much more attractive places to live and work and more and more are people looking to cities as places to lay down roots, invest in property and become civically involved. As those of us who are getting into the issues of city living, owning your homes, and developing roots in your new neighborhoods, joining zoning committees, planning sessions, urban gardening or even doing city planning, we must see the cities that are beautiful and appeal to our senses, and see what they are composed of, like Savannah, Georgia.

Right now, cities like  our Philadelphia, Pennsylvania are undergoing this transformation in some sections. There is a strong movement towards Philadelphia’s new urbanism, from a solid economic sense to a visionary idealistic desire, both of which are closing in on each other which is why Philadelphia is most definitely an important city to watch. Philadelphia’s sheer magnitude and population is relegated into a grid of row-houses that is oriented more in relation to its two rivers than strickly North-South. Its expansive park system is one of the largest in the world for a city of this size, and includes numerous squares and public spaces throughout with plans for more “micro parklets”.  It is also the lucky inheritor of an extensive public transportation system that includes trolleys and subways.  The new urbanism in Philadelphia is growing with city Planning in mind as well as gardening, urban farming, political activism, art, music, literature and  culture. All of this occurring side by side with an antiquated political system, vast wastelands of urban planning mishaps, some still on the drawing-boards , poverty and blight.

However, the infrastructure of what makes a beautiful city is in Philadelphia as well- if the houses were repaired in a sensitive manner and there were appropriately planted street trees that were cared for, like in Savannah. The row houses of Philadelphia, like in Savannah are everything that new urbanism requires: environmental viability in terms of efficiency, and the urban density that makes neighborhoods lively  but not overcrowded, buildings own-able and relatively easy to care for. Rowhouses also offer an opportunity for architectural splendor, most opportunities of this have been squandered since the 1950s, but there is plenty of intact housing stock left dating back to the 18th century. When walking the streets of Savannah it became increasingly apparent that these views of row-houses, generous porches and ample public  green spaces could be in Philly. Maybe what could be done with some of Philadelphia’s vast amounts of vacant land.

 

Savannah Street Trees, www.thesanguineroot.com

Savannah Street Trees, www.thesanguineroot.com

While Savannah and its street and park trees will always remain unique in its atmospheric qualities, history and aesthetic patina of culture and location, it is these very things that every city must embrace to re-establish themselves as livable places again. Often removing something that is awful and misplaced can help revive a once beautiful city, such as a highway.  San Francisco, already beautiful,  liberated its waterfront by removing a highway.  One day, NYC hopes to remove Madison Square Garden, a horrific 1960s stadium in the middle of the city.  Save what is there that creates a sense of place, and re-invent by looking at what works in the cities that are magnificent and iconic.

Savannah Street Trees, www.thesanguineroot.com

Savannah Street Trees, www.thesanguineroot.com

Savannah has that sense of place. This is not accidental or an after effect of some other great series of events  beyond our control, rather it is a result of carefully thought-out plans and ideas, such as this one written in 1897  from An Examination of the Street and Park Trees of Savannah, Georgia:  

Parks and squares should be retreats supplying in parts cool shade as well as pleasing sights for the eye. Unlike the street trees, not all the park trees are to play the role of shade producers; some will be for shade, while some will serve only as elements in a total or partial beautifying effect

–  Park and Tree Commission, Savanna, Georgia,  Bulletin 1, Geo B. Sudworth, April, 1897

Each and every tree was considered thoughtfully.

Savannah Street Trees, www.thesanguineroot.com

Savannah Street Trees, www.thesanguineroot.comt

So these painted shutters and elegantly preserved brick facades and stoops of these rowhouses work together with the Magnolia grandiflora and Quercus virginiana to create a view of this quintessentially southern mercantile city, one of whose charm was conceived of  and cultivated with the very intent to charm.

Savannah Street Trees, www.thesanguineroot.com

Savannah Street Trees, www.thesanguineroot.com

Quercus virginiana, bark and trunk.

Savannah Street Trees, www.thesanguineroot.com

Savannah Street Trees, www.thesanguineroot.com

 

Savannah Street Trees, www.thesanguineroot.com

Savannah Street Trees, www.thesanguineroot.com

 

Savannah Street Trees, www.thesanguineroot.com

Savannah Street Trees, www.thesanguineroot.com

 

Savannah Street Trees, www.thesanguineroot.com

Savannah Street Trees, www.thesanguineroot.com

IMG_3783 IMG_3797

And lastly, we visit a brand new city, Suwannee, Georgia, just outside of Atlanta. Here the developers embraced some of the ideas of the new urbanism and planned their community around row-houses grouped around public greens, newly planted with Quercus virginiana, the Live Oak, and named the green Savannah. These houses were situated adjacent to a commercial area designed to look like a typical Georgia town, surrounding a green. Here is a genuine decision to create a sense of place, with housing that can create a community alongside public space and walking distance from commercial interests. On top of that this community is located next to a huge park with over five miles of walking trails!

Suwannee, Georgia, housing development

Suwannee, Georgia, housing development. www.thesanguineroot.com

This new city lacks the patina of age, but it has all of the intentions of that sense of place! It is very instructional seeing pictures of newly -built developments whether it is in the 1890s or recently, the lack of trees or the small size of them. How much properly appointed and well thought-out plantings of trees contribute to the atmosphere of a city is astonishing. In a neighborhood with old majestic trees, one can benefit from such foresight and the shade and beauty; however likely there will be disappointment when these trees must be taken down inevitably, as such lamentations were expressed in the local Savannah papers about the removal of a dying but much -loved tree in one of the squares. In a contrasting light, the inhabitants of this new square Savannah get the pleasure of watching these Live Oaks grow.

Suwannee, Georgia. www.thesanguineroot.com

Suwannee, Georgia. www.thesanguineroot.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WOLF CREEK TROUT LILY PRESERVE

Thursday, March 13th, 2014

THE SANGUINE ROOT VISITS THE WOLF CREEK TROUT LILY PRESERVE IN GRADY COUNTY GEORGIA DURING PEAK BLOOM. MILLIONS OF BLOOMING DIMPLED TROUT LILIES CARPET 15 ACRES OF A NORTH FACING HARDWOOD HILLSIDE IN THE AFTERNOON SUN, MONDAY FEBRUARY 24TH, 2014.

Wolf Creek Trout Lily Preserve, www.thesanguineroot.com

Wolf Creek Trout Lily Preserve, www.thesanguineroot.com

Wolf Creek Trout Lily Preserve, www.thesanguineroot.com

Wolf Creek Trout Lily Preserve, www.thesanguineroot.com

Wolf Creek Trout Lily Preserve

Wolf Creek Trout Lily Preserve

We had been wanting to visit this place for a long time, and the opportunity arose as it just happened to coincide with our winter vacation to neighboring Thomasville, Georgia. Seeing this  preserve at peak bloom was also a very lucky moment in our travels. The stars were indeed aligned just right for us on this balmy, sunny afternoon in this southern Georgia hardwood forest.

image

Wolf Creek Trout Lily Preserve, www.thesanguineroot.com

Wolf Creek Trout Lily Preserve, www.thesanguineroot.com

Erythronium umbilicatum, the Dimpled Trout Lily

image

Wolf Creek Trout Lily Preserve, www.thesanguineroot.com

Wolf Creek Trout Lily Preserve, www.thesanguineroot.com

Trillium maculatum, the spotted Trillium

Trillium maculatum, Wolf Creek Trout Lily Preserve, www.thesanguineroot.com

Trillium maculatum, Wolf Creek Trout Lily Preserve, www.thesanguineroot.com

Trillium maculatum, the spotted trillium, Wolf crek Trout Lily Preserve, Grady County , Georgia. www.thesanguineroot.com

Trillium maculatum, the spotted trillium, Wolf creek Trout Lily Preserve, Grady County , Georgia. www.thesanguineroot.com

 

For us northerners, seeing this vast hillside of green flowering things at the end of February was a sight to behold! blooming amidst Saw Palmetto and the Trout lilies, the Trilliums were truly pleasing to the eye and welcoming to the camera’s lens. The Wolf Creek Trout Lily Preserve encourages photography.

This is a place of spectacular beauty, a place that entirely transcends the monotonous landscapes of the developments and highways, the attempts at landscaping and the increasing lack of a sense of place that is dominating the developed vistas of America at this time. A place like this gives us a sense of where we are and when; it is a place where we retain a perspective on the location and the season, on the speciation found in the natural world around us. When we find ourselves marveling in the beauty of other species and in the places we find, discover and seek them out, we are further enlightened and enabled into the landscape.

This is one of those places, so unique in its location, and so rare and abundant, a place similar to this is usually found hundreds of miles north in the Appalachian Mountains. Why this is located here in Southern Georgia is possibly related to the Ice Ages. An astounding place such as this makes us think of botanical history in relation to geological history; an exercise that helps us stretch our minds into the milleniums past; here is a place where we see beauty and excite fascination in the times that have existed long before us.

Just some of the other species at Wolf Creek: Southern Twayblade Orchid (Listera australis), Greenfly Orchid (Epidendrum magnoliae), Coral Root Orchid (Corallorhiza wisteriana) , Bloodroot (Sanguinaria canadensis), and of course many, many others such as Oaks, maples, beeches and blueberries, Saw Palmetto, just for starters to get you interested!

 

 

Wolf Creek Trout Lily Preserve, www.thesanguineroot.com

Wolf Creek Trout Lily Preserve, www.thesanguineroot.com

The story behind how the Wolf Creek Trout Lily Preserve was created is inspirational. It was to be developed into housing. It had been known for a long time as a property with a noteworthy wildflower population, and it took the efforts of very dedicated people to save it from destruction.

From reading the history, it could be argued that this land was saved because of the housing market collapse in 2007-2008.

Now it is owned by Grady County and is preserved in perpetuity as a preserve. This did not come easy, however, and the story of its preservation is a inspiring reminder of what it takes to retain the beauty in the world around us.

Wolf Creek Trout Lily Preserve, www.thesanguineroot.com

Wolf Creek Trout Lily Preserve, www.thesanguineroot.com

Here is a trillium with four leaves, folks. They are named for their three leaves, petals, sepals. Oddities, always in nature, making the world go round.

Wolf Creek Trout Lily Preserve  www.thesanguineroot.com

Wolf Creek Trout Lily Preserve www.thesanguineroot.com

These Trout Lilies exhibit the recurved petals so distinguishing of this flower. note the Trillium maculatum in the backround.

Wolf Creek Trout Lily Preserve  www.thesanguineroot.com

Wolf Creek Trout Lily Preserve www.thesanguineroot.com

This photo was taken in the best spot (noted in the brochure), where the vantage point of Trout Lily coverage is maximized. You can see the pitch of the slope in the horizon, which is helpful in getting a feel for the landscape.

The caretakers of this preserve have gone to great extents to make our visit truly pleasurable, from creating a great website, promoting it in the local papers, facilitating parking arrangements, creating signage, brochures, and maps. There was a box full of brochures in the parking area that approached the topics of native plants, invasive plants and ecology.  As we walked into the preserve there were signs that reminded us to stay on the trails. we found ourselves taking extra precautions on the trails to not step on any Trout Lilies or Trilliums. (It takes years for a single Trout Lily plant to make it to bloom, so to step on one and crush it in the act of trying to appreciate it is antithetical to the exercise)

Wolf Creek Trout Lily Preserve, www.thesanguineroot.com

Wolf Creek Trout Lily Preserve, www.thesanguineroot.com

Here we are, Sean Solomon and Isabelle Dijols, finally at the long awaited and oft talked about Wolf Creek Trout Lily Preserve. (Photo by Cathy Smith)

Photo by Isabelle Dijols, Wolf Creek Trout Lily Preserve, Grady County Georgia. www.thesanguineroot.com

Photo by Isabelle Dijols, Wolf Creek Trout Lily Preserve, Grady County Georgia. www.thesanguineroot.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

THE BALD EAGLES AT CONOWINGO DAM, MARYLAND

Tuesday, March 11th, 2014

We had been wanting to visit this place since last fall, where we heard there were Bald Eagles living next to this giant hydro-electric dam on the Susquehanna River, not far from one of our favorite spots, Susquehanna State Park.

The bald Eagles at Conowingo Dam, Maryland. www.thesanguineroot.com

The bald Eagles at Conowingo Dam, Maryland. www.thesanguineroot.com

We grabbed our binoculars and drove down and over the dam.

The bald Eagles at Conowingo Dam, Maryland. www.thesanguineroot.com

The bald Eagles at Conowingo Dam, Maryland. www.thesanguineroot.com

We came to see the Bald Eagles first and foremost.
We saw one fly down from its nesting area atop a transmission tower and catch a fish!

IMG_4713

The bald Eagles at Conowingo Dam, Maryland. www.thesanguineroot.com

The bald Eagles at Conowingo Dam, Maryland. www.thesanguineroot.com

It grabbed the fish out of the water with its talons and then landed on a concrete wall next to the dam.The fish can be seen at the Eagle’s feet.

These next few pictures visually tell the story.

The bald Eagles at Conowingo Dam, Maryland. www.thesanguineroot.com

The bald Eagles at Conowingo Dam, Maryland. www.thesanguineroot.com

The bald Eagles at Conowingo Dam, Maryland. www.thesanguineroot.com

The bald Eagles at Conowingo Dam, Maryland. www.thesanguineroot.com

It began to eat the fish when a Blue Heron, who was also very interested in the fish landed next to the Bald Eagle.

The bald Eagles at Conowingo Dam, Maryland. www.thesanguineroot.com

The bald Eagles at Conowingo Dam, Maryland. www.thesanguineroot.com

The Heron watched the Eagle intently and then suddenly another Blue Heron landed to the Left side of the Eagle, distractingly enough so that the first heron was able to grab the rest of the fish from the Eagle, eat it and then flew off. The Eagle then just sat there awhile, taking in the afternoon sun.

The bald Eagles at Conowingo Dam, Maryland. www.thesanguineroot.com

The bald Eagles at Conowingo Dam, Maryland. www.thesanguineroot.com

The fish can be seen hanging from the mouth of the Blue Heron.

The bald Eagles at Conowingo Dam, Maryland. www.thesanguineroot.com

The bald Eagles at Conowingo Dam, Maryland. www.thesanguineroot.com

IMG_4731The Heron takes off, withe fish in its mouth, seen in the shadow. Looking up, a flock of geese, heading north cross under the Moon.

The bald Eagles at Conowingo Dam, Maryland. www.thesanguineroot.com

The bald Eagles at Conowingo Dam, Maryland. www.thesanguineroot.com